Skip to content

FIAC - ONLINE VIEWING ROOM

Dorothy Cross
Willie Doherty
Hannah Fitz
Richard Gorman
Callum Innes
Elizabeth Magill
Brian Maguire
Isabel Nolan
Lawrence Weiner
Paul Winstanley

Video-Show

details of works

Slide-Show

Slide-Show Thumbnails

Dorothy Cross 
Right Ball and Left Ball
2007
cast bronze, unique
34 x 20 x 19 cm / 13.4 x 7.9 x 7.5 in 
37 x 19 x 17 cm / 14.6 x 7.5 x 6.7 in 
DC20407AB

Dorothy Cross 
Family
2005
cast bronze
2/4 from an edition of 4 + 1AP
dimensions variable
38 x 19 x 20 cm / 15 x 7.5 x 7.9 in
25 x 24 x 13 cm / 9.8 x 9.4 x 5.1 in 
16 x 15 x 13 cm / 6.3 x 5.9 x 5.1 in 
DC17405-2/4

Willie Doherty 
Ghost Walk III
2016
pigment print mounted on aluminium framed
2/3 from an edition of 3
106.6 x 159.8 cm / 42 x 62.9 in image size 
WD21916-2/3

Hannah Fitz 
Eye Rolling All The Way Down
2020
Steel, Card, Wire, Plaster Bandage, Plaster Filler, Resin, Paint, Clothing
154 x 95 x 160 cm / 60.6 x 37.4 x 63 in 
HF02220

Richard Gorman 
viking
2021
oil on linen
100 x 100 cm / 39.4 x 39.4 in   
RG100521

Richard Gorman 
cromaty
2021
oil on linen
100 x 100 cm / 39.4 x 39.4 in   
RG100620

Callum Innes 
Untitled Lamp Black / Delft Blue
2021
oil on linen
175 x 172 cm / 68.9 x 67.7 in   
CI C 01 2021

Elizabeth Magill 
The sky was all orange (2)
2021
oil and screenprint on canvas
128 x 148 cm / 50.4 x 58.3 in   
EM40821 

Brian Maguire 
Arizona 6
2021
acrylic on canvas
140 x 200 cm / 55.1 x 78.7 in   
BM41321

Isabel Nolan 
Stelliferous to Degenerate
2020
water based oil on canvas
70 x 90 x 3 cm / 27.6 x 35.4 x 1.2 in 
72.5 x 92.5 x 4.5 cm / 28.5 x 36.4 x 1.8 in framed
IN46720

Lawrence Weiner 
2019
mixed media on archival paper
48.5 x 61 cm / 19.1 x 24 in unframed  
52 x 64 cm / 20.5 x 25.2 in framed  
LW00320

Paul Winstanley 
Interior with a Large Window (Morning Light)
2020
Oil on Linen
220 x 148 x 5 cm / 86.6 x 58.3 x 2 in 
PW09120

Dorothy Cross 
Right Ball and Left Ball
2007
cast bronze, unique
34 x 20 x 19 cm / 13.4 x 7.9 x 7.5 in 
37 x 19 x 17 cm / 14.6 x 7.5 x 6.7 in 
DC20407AB

Dorothy Cross 
Family
2005
cast bronze
2/4 from an edition of 4 + 1AP
dimensions variable
38 x 19 x 20 cm / 15 x 7.5 x 7.9 in
25 x 24 x 13 cm / 9.8 x 9.4 x 5.1 in 
16 x 15 x 13 cm / 6.3 x 5.9 x 5.1 in 
DC17405-2/4

Willie Doherty 
Ghost Walk III
2016
pigment print mounted on aluminium framed
2/3 from an edition of 3
106.6 x 159.8 cm / 42 x 62.9 in image size 
WD21916-2/3

Hannah Fitz 
Eye Rolling All The Way Down
2020
Steel, Card, Wire, Plaster Bandage, Plaster Filler, Resin, Paint, Clothing
154 x 95 x 160 cm / 60.6 x 37.4 x 63 in 
HF02220

Richard Gorman 
viking
2021
oil on linen
100 x 100 cm / 39.4 x 39.4 in   
RG100521

Richard Gorman 
cromaty
2021
oil on linen
100 x 100 cm / 39.4 x 39.4 in   
RG100620

Callum Innes 
Untitled Lamp Black / Delft Blue
2021
oil on linen
175 x 172 cm / 68.9 x 67.7 in   
CI C 01 2021

Elizabeth Magill 
The sky was all orange (2)
2021
oil and screenprint on canvas
128 x 148 cm / 50.4 x 58.3 in   
EM40821 

Brian Maguire 
Arizona 6
2021
acrylic on canvas
140 x 200 cm / 55.1 x 78.7 in   
BM41321

Isabel Nolan 
Stelliferous to Degenerate
2020
water based oil on canvas
70 x 90 x 3 cm / 27.6 x 35.4 x 1.2 in 
72.5 x 92.5 x 4.5 cm / 28.5 x 36.4 x 1.8 in framed
IN46720

Lawrence Weiner 
2019
mixed media on archival paper
48.5 x 61 cm / 19.1 x 24 in unframed  
52 x 64 cm / 20.5 x 25.2 in framed  
LW00320

Paul Winstanley 
Interior with a Large Window (Morning Light)
2020
Oil on Linen
220 x 148 x 5 cm / 86.6 x 58.3 x 2 in 
PW09120

Dorothy Cross

b.1956, Cork, Ireland.

DC 1

Right Ball and Left Ball
2007
cast bronze, unique

Like many of Dorothy Cross’ sculptures, Family (2005) and Right Ball and Left Ball (2007) sees the artist work with found objects, transforming them with characteristic wit and sophistication. 

Right Ball and Left Ball (2007) presents a pair of deflated footballs, no longer of use, their past buoyancy now anchored in bronze. Emerging from each is a cast of the artist’s hands, index finger extended upwards in a pointed gesture suggesting optimism or aspiration.

In Family (2005) we see the artist’s undeniable craft and humour come together. Three spider crabs were found, dead for some time but still together. The intricacies of their form and the oddness of their sideways manoeuvres forever cast in bronze. The ‘father’ adorned with an improbable appendage also pointing upwards and away.

DC 2

Family
2005
cast bronze
edition of 4

Working in sculpture, film and photography, Dorothy Cross examines the relationship between living beings and the natural world. Living in Connemara, a rural area on Ireland’s west coast, the artist sees the body and nature as sites of constant change, creation and destruction, new and old. This flux emerges as strange and unexpected encounters. Many of Cross’ works incorporate items found on the shore, including animals that die of natural causes. During the 1990s, the artist produced a series of works using cow udders, which drew on the animals' rich store of symbolic associations across cultures to investigate the construction of sexuality

Willie Doherty

b.1959, Derry, Northern Ireland.

WD 2

Ghost Walk III
2016
pigment print mounted on aluminium, framed
edition of 3

Since the 1980s, Willie Doherty has been a pioneering figure in contemporary art film and photography. At once highly seductive and visually disorientating, Doherty’s artworks tend to begin as responses to specific terrains (most often mysterious isolated settings; places, we suspect, with a troubled past) and evolve as complex reflections on how we look at such locations – or on what stories might be told about their hidden histories.

'For almost four decades, the art of Willie Doherty has been profoundly affected by border landscapes, border atmospheres, border experiences — in Ireland and beyond. Again and again, Doherty has haunted such spaces, wandering along country roads or lingering at suburban margins, exploring locations where, visibly or invisibly, one state connects with  another. (Or, put differently: the points where one state is separated from another.) He has been compelled to visit and revisit peripheral zones, condemned to reckon repeatedly with their fraught histories and disrupted geographies.' - Declan Long 'Where are we now?' from Willie Doherty, Where/Dove published to accompany the artist's 2021 exhibition at Fondazione Modena, Milan and Ulster Museum, Belfast.

 

WD 1

Ghost Walk II
2016
pigment print mounted on aluminium, framed
edition of 3

Willie Doherty
b.1959, Derry, Northern Ireland.

'Willie Doherty revisits border landscapes in Ghost Walk II and III, compelled to reckon repeatedly with their fraught histories and disrupted geographies. Again and again, Doherty has revisited such spaces, wandering along country roads, haunted by borderlands, agitated by their tensions and uncertainties. These works embody an unsettled, uneasy sense of place, landscapes of division, violence, trauma and loss. But visual evidence of such grim inheritance is rarely overt; there might be hints, half-clues, residues, near-microscopic remainders of … something. Or there might be nothing at all.'

Declan Long
Where / Dove

Hannah Fitz

b. 1989, Dublin, Ireland.

HF 1

Eye Rolling All The Way Down
2020
Steel, Card, Wire, Plaster Bandage, Plaster Filler, Resin, Paint, Clothing

"Eye Rolling All The Way Down was made during the initial months of the pandemic in 2020. I had been focusing on generic representations of the human body, wanting to create a false ‘universal’ form that I could manipulate and underline as strange. This work began with that same logic, but uses a depiction of movement to spread the body out over space. Its motion is recognisable vis a vis image - rather than bodily experience - using the elasticity of a cartoon, or the distortion you'd see in a glitching video to lose the boundaries of the form." - Hannah Fitz

HF 2
HF 3

Fitz’s sculptures are carefully constructed, rejecting sleekness for a finish that is deliberately crude, scrappy and uncertain, articulated by curling lines and uncertain wobbles. Despite this ‘handled’ quality, they present a uniform, reductive version of their subjects. Fitz’s figures are featureless everymen, unidentifiable aside from their actions.

Richard Gorman

b. 1946, Dublin, Ireland.

RG 1

dogger
2021
oil on linen

Richard Gorman
b. 1946, Dublin, Ireland.

As Gorman’s understanding and mastery of colour has deepened, he has begun to use it not only as a harmonic device, but as an active and animating element in his paintings: flat blocks of colour step to an offbeat rhythm, laid down in a jazz cool palette. Giving a nod to the gestural, expressionist works with which Gorman began his career in the 1980s, this new body of work takes on a more liberated, looser and freer painterly approach, all while demonstrating the intuitive balancing of colour, form and line that his work is prized for.

RG 2

viking
2021
oil on linen

As Gorman’s understanding and mastery of colour has deepened, he has begun to use it not only as a harmonic device, but as an active and animating element in his paintings: flat blocks of colour step to an offbeat rhythm, laid down in a jazz cool palette. Giving a nod to the gestural, expressionist works with which Gorman began his career in the 1980s, this new body of work takes on a more liberated, looser and freer painterly approach, all while demonstrating the intuitive balancing of colour, form and line that his work is prized for.

'This has echoes with the way fiction can be written. You begin with a very precise scene, or set of memories, and slowly, in the act of writing, you begin to scrape them away, until their very opposite may emerge. Or what comes is merely the emotion and nothing of the precise configurations with which you began. The few stray details which you leave in may seem casual to the reader, but they can have immense energy and power for the writer; they have been the route towards everything else.'  - Colm Toíbín on Richard Gorman

Callum Innes

b. 1962, Edinburgh, Scotland

CI 1

Untitled Lamp Black / Quinacridone Gold
2020
oil on linen

Innes' paintings are highly disciplined but also uncertain spaces, combining the controlled authority of monochrome geometric forms with ever-present traces of fluidity and an always-apparent tendency towards formal dissolution. Central to his distinctive artistic process is a dual activity of painting and ‘unpainting’. Innes begins by applying densely mixed dark pigment onto a prepared canvas before then brushing the wet surface with turpentine: strategically stripping away sections of the painted space before it has entirely settled.

“I make a painting and work with the surface, then dissolve it, taking it off with turpentine. In many ways, I am dissolving an image that is in my head… With the paintings, I make a black made of many colours… until I dissolve it. Then the colours separate so that colour will be revealed.” - Callum Innes

CI 2

Untitled Lamp Black / Delft Blue
2021
oil on linen

Elizabeth Magill

b.1959, Canada.

EM 2

Red Stars
2021
oil and screen-print on canvas

Since she began exhibiting in the late-1980s, Elizabeth Magill has developed a highly idiosyncratic approach to painting and printmaking. She is celebrated for her evocative landscapes, which capture atmospheric conditions with great sensitivity: the luminosity of daybreak, or the cool glow of moonlight. The scenes appear to be sited on the edge of urbanity – roofs, street-lamps or telephone wires can occasionally be sighted in the background, but human figures are rare. Instead, clusters of trees dominate Magill’s compositional arrangements, and only through their branches can hedges, hills and radiant skies be glimpsed.

"In California last year, Lisa woke up one morning and the sky was all orange. She lives in an area surrounded by trees that were burning by wildfires. Devastating as these events are, they can display an incredible visual beauty. Many of the tree imagery in these recent paintings were photographed in this part of USA in 2019. Scenes resonate differently when events happen somewhere you may have been." -  Elizabeth Magill

EM 1

The sky was all orange (2)
2021
oil and screenprint on canvas

In California last year, Lisa woke up one morning and the sky was all orange. She lives in an area surrounded by trees that were burning by wildfires. Devasting as these events are, they can display an incredible visual beauty. Many of the tree imagery in these recent paintings were photographed in this part of USA in 2019. Scenes resonate differently when events happen somewhere you may have been. 

Elizabeth Magill

Brian Maguire

b. 1951, Dublin, Ireland.

BM 1

Arizona 3 
2020
acrylic on canvas

In his new series, 'Arizona' Brian Maguire continues his critique of contemporary capitalism, painting images based on events at the southern border of the USA. Some five years ago Maguire began to research the annual fatalities of Central American migrants in the deserts around Tucson, Arizona. The numbers of those who have died are frightening, the recent annual average is 145 deaths. In September 2019 Maguire made contact with the Chief Medical Officer of Pima County who allowed access to the images of the dead which were originally created by law enforcement. From 500 cases Maguire selected 90 as an archive from which to create these paintings. The dead remain anonymous to protect the families privacy.

Since the very beginning of his career in the 1970s, Brian Maguire has approached painting as an act of solidarity. He operates a truly engaged practice, compelled by the raw realities of humanity’s violence against itself, and the potential for justice. Maguire’s preoccupations draw him to the margins of the art world—alternative space, prisons, women’s shelters, and psychiatric institutions—making shows in traditional gallery and museum spaces something of a rarity. Maguire’s most recent paintings directly confront issues of migration, displacement and human dignity in the face of the current global unrest. 

BM 2

Arizona 6
2021
acrylic on canvas

Isabel Nolan

b. 1974, Dublin, Ireland

IN 1

Stelliferous to Degenerate
2020
water based oil on canvas

IN 2

The extravagantly, even preposterously titled 'Stelliferous to degenerate' refers to a time in the extremely far future when the universe will no longer produce stars.  Using familiar materials (paint or colouring pencil) Nolan’s work consistently picks away at the coherence of our human perspective as applied to the wildness and strangeness of nature. Rendering cosmic forms at a wholly domestic human scale, the artist similarly makes the cosmic into something relatively cosy.

Amongst Isabel Nolan’s new paintings and drawings are a number of erupting, colourful landscapes; scenes of colliding, looped forms and forces, a world or worlds simultaneously coalescing and disintegrating.  They depict disorder and collapse into something beautiful but not cogent or explicable.  Nolan has described the impetus to make these works as a paradoxical desire to imagine how the future might look when humans are not present to witness it.

IN 3

Isabel Nolan
'Curling up with reality'
 

Now available, a new monograph covering Isabel Nolan's work and writing from 2011-2020, published by Launchpad, London and Kerlin Gallery, Dublin, in association with Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin. 

Editor, Gerrie Van Noord. Designed by Tony Waddingham.

Lawrence Weiner

b.1942, New York, USA.

LW 1

Currently on show

We are delighted to present Lawrence Weiner’s first solo show at Kerlin Gallery and his first solo show in Ireland in 28 years. The exhibition is comprised of three sculptures and three works on paper. The sculptures in text, ‘HELD JUST ABOVE THE CURRENT’, ‘IN LINE WITH SOMETHING ELSE’ and ‘PUT WITH THE OTHER THINGS’ are presented in Irish and English. 

LW 1

2019
mixed media on archival paper

Paul Winstanley

b. 1954, Manchester, UK.

“Although the image is based on a real and specific place, its international Modernist design could place it almost anywhere from South America to Africa to Europe. This generic quality resonates with many other paintings of mine. On the one hand it puts historic Modernism at the heart of the subject while on the other it’s internal sense of light places it firmly in a tangible, experienced present. Whatever ideas the painting contains it always comes back to the visual experience." – Paul Winstanley

Paul Winstanley is a painter who uses the ostensibly traditional genres of Landscape / Interior / Still Life / Figure / to create works of conceptual rigour that present the relationship of the viewer to the painting as central to the content of the work. Always methodical, often melancholic his painterly depictions of landscapes, walkways, veiled windows, TV Lounges, art school studios and individuals distracted in contemplation are rendered in an exacting and subtle palette. 

PW 1

Interior with a Large Window (Morning Light)
2020
Oil on Linen

Downloads

DOROTHY CROSS
WILLIE DOHERTY
HANNAH FITZ
RICHARD GORMAN
CALLUM INNES
ELIZABETH MAGILL
ISABEL NOLAN
LAWRENCE WEINER
PAUL WINSTANLEY